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Building a Better Discussion

Thanks to Lee McGaan for sharing this article on class discussion! To learn more, see Jay R. Howard’s new book, Discussion in the College Classroom: Getting Your Students Engaged and Participating in Person and Onlinephoto_71145_wide_largeThe author also recommends “The Dreaded Discussion: Ten Ways to Start” by historian Peter Frederick, who visited Monmouth in 2011.

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The Semester is Over! It’s Time to Write!

How can you achieve those summer writing goals? Check out this advice from Joli Jensen.

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Writing Center Hours During Finals 2015

During Finals Week, the Writing Center will be open:

  • Thursday, April 7th—–4-6pm
  • Friday, April 8th ——–4-6pm
  • Saturday, April 9th —–4-6pm
  • Sunday, April 10th——4-6pm
  • Monday, April 11th —–4-6pm

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Recommended Resources for Teaching English Language Learners

Looking for some resources on supporting English Language Learners? Check out the University of North Carolina’s “Tips on Teaching ESL Students” and the Ontario College of Art & Design’s “Inclusive Teaching Booklet” for working with international students. Tutors, you may be interested in UNC’s “Just Check My Grammar.”

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SoTL Conference: 9-10 October 2015

The 7th Annual Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Conference will take place at Maryville University, October 9-10, 2015. Within an overarching focus of Integrating the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning into Academic Culture, this year’s specific theme will be:

Creating a More Inclusive Learning Community: Awareness, Action, Inquiry

The twin goals of diversity and inclusion are central components of most college and university strategic plans. These commitments recognize a striking new reality in demographics and an uncompromising belief that our nation’s future depends largely on higher education’s capacity to effectively serve a more diversified student body. In support of this critical agenda, our conference goal is for all participants to leave with:

  • Increased awareness of the exclusionary practices and prejudices that have had a negative learning impact on students of different backgrounds and abilities
  • A repertoire of new actions and strategies for building more inclusive learning communities for all students
  • A commitment to try new approaches and examine their impact through SoTL inquiry.

Keynote Speakers:

Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington is President and Founder of the Washington Consulting Group, a Multicultural Organizational Development Firm in Baltimore, MD, and President and a Founder of the Social Justice Training Institute, focused on bringing about cultural change through a diversity lens.

Dr. Sherry Lee Linkon is Professor of English and Director of the Writing Program at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. She conducts SoTL research on teaching and student learning in disciplinary and interdisciplinary courses in the humanities, and  examines social class issues in higher education.

PLUS: A variety of practical Workshops, Panels, and Interactive Sessions highlighting strategies to promote more inclusive learning environments for all students and for traditionally under-represented groups in higher education such as:

  • Students of color
  • Students with disabilities
  • Students from low socioeconomic backgrounds
  • Students who identify with LGTB
  • Students from diverse faith traditions
  • Veterans

Registration for the conference will be open on or before May 1. Updates and full conference details can be found on our website.

Call for Proposals and link for Submissions (https://blogs.maryville.edu/ctl/services-events/2015-sotl-conference/submissions/) are now on our website.

We encourage you to submit a proposal and to plan to participate in all aspects of the Oct. 9-10 weekend. Please address any questions concerning this announcement to: musotl@maryville.edu

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Writing Expectations: What Students Want From Professors

Undergraduate Mikal Cardine offers a student perspective on learning to write in the disciplines in this week’s Writing Campus blog: “Professor Expectations of Writing Assignments: A Student Perspective.” 

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Writing Center Closed During Easter Break

The Writing Center will be CLOSED Thursday, April 2nd, Sunday, April 5th, & Monday, April 6th.

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Is “design thinking” the new liberal arts?

“Stanford’s uses what the local culture calls design thinking: ‘to equip our students with a methodology for producing reliably innovative results in any field.'”

Stanford’s d.school models a form of education driven by collaborative, creative problem-solving, a playful approach to academic discovery where students learn to ask questions rather than find answers.  While the author laments design thinking’s lack of interest in “pastness,” he is optimistic about the interdisciplinary approach to learning and problem solving. Read more at “Is design thinking the new liberal arts?” 

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Teaching and Reflection: An Interactive Workshop with Jane Jakoubek

Last night, Jane Jakoubek led a fabulous hands-on workshop about teaching reflection. We learned to guide students through the process of noticing, finding patterns, and learning by practicing this process ourselves to reflect on our own teaching.

The workshop began with some guided meditation followed by a process of noticing–writing individual sentences all starting with the phrase “I notice…” and then sharing in small groups. Jane noted that this first step is crucial: we need to unpack what we know before we can explore what we don’t know, and we need to take time to gather these “noticings” and get them on paper before we can do something with them.

Next, we talked about identifying patterns in what we noticed: themes, trends, cycles, underlying assumptions, actions, and reactions. Again, individual writing time was followed by an opportunity for small group sharing.

Finally, we looked at what we can learn from noticing and finding patterns: What is speaking to me in these notes? What does my experience tell me? What am I called to do in this moment? What will I carry away from this time?

While we shared a meal, Jane also offered some sample reflection prompts with a grading rubric and tips for teaching reflection.

Jane has a wonderful talent for creating a space to slow down and think carefully, creatively, and intentionally. I hope that we can make events like this one an annual part of the CAC program! Thank you, Jane!

 

 

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Search Smarter with Google

Using Google to start your research process? Search smarter with these tips:

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